Share and Share Alike? Not when it Comes to Enterprise Collaboration Part I

We gods of technology want to encourage collaboration—but we can’t expose core IP or allow data breaches in the process of supporting how our employees increasingly want and need to work.


5 February 2013

If your parents did a halfway decent job raising you, they probably taught you that sharing is good. And, if you did as they told you and shared your toys, your cookies, your feelings—pretty much everything but your germs—well then good things would happen to you, right? What goes around comes around and all that good karma stuff.

At the risk of reinforcing some of the stereotypes and jokes out there about the social skills of the IT set, I’m here to tell you that not all sharing is good. At least not in the corporate environment. Inter-enterprise collaboration solutions are either a Pandora’s box or Prometheus’ gift. Much as the Greek Titan’s bestowal of fire on mankind helped spark progress and civilization, the introduction of document- and file-sharing solutions to the enterprise is helping to fuel business growth and success. But bring in the wrong one, and you risk lifting the lid off a box of evils, unleashing all sorts of compromises to enterprise security and corporate compliance.

We gods of technology want to encourage collaboration—but we can’t expose core IP or allow data breaches in the process of supporting how our employees increasingly want and need to work. We know how important the former is but the latter weighs heavy on all of our minds. In fact, according to a survey of 652 IT and business decision makers conducted by a global strategy consulting firm and commissioned by Intralinks, 92% of companies are concerned about losing control over their confidential, sensitive, and mission-critical information. And, as recent news reports underscore, the influx of consumer-grade file- sharing technologies are giving us all more to worry about each and every day.

Safeguarding the security of the network isn’t just a matter of knowing which collaboration tools introduce risk, but also understanding how employee behaviors and attitudes factors into the equation.

There are good sharers and bad sharers and organizations need to determine which category their workforce falls under in order to better understand how to employ secure and efficient technologies to optimize workflow. In our next post, we’ll help you identify the different types of sharing personalities.



John Landy

John Landy

John Landy is the chief security officer at Intralinks. Having served as chief technology officer at Intralinks for the past 5 years, he utilizes his technical background to work with clients to understand their security needs in sharing and storing sensitive information. John has been working on internal Intralinks controls for enterprise security and corporate risk and oversees a function comprising Customer Engagement, Security Architecture and a Security Operations Center.