Share and Share Alike? Not when it Comes to Enterprise Collaboration Part II

In our previous post, we wrote about how there were good sharers and bad sharers and organizations need to determine which category their workforce falls under in order to better understand how to employ secure and efficient technologies to optimize workflow.


6 February 2013

In our previous post, we wrote about how there were good sharers and bad sharers and organizations need to determine which category their workforce falls under in order to better understand how to employ secure and efficient technologies to optimize workflow.

To help you do that, our survey identified the five most common sharing personalities—see if you recognize any of your employees among the types below: through the survey, sharers can be divided into five categories: Strategic Users, Securers, Concerned Sharers, Convenience Users, and Indifferent Users.

 

  • Strategic Users: These employees are like the ship captains of the enterprise—they set the course for the business and navigate it through trying conditions. They demand a mix of security features and productivity tools.
  • Securers: Otherwise known as the company gatekeepers, Securers are most likely to answer your question with a resounding NO! They are concerned about anything that enables data to pass through the firewall.
  • Similar to Securers are the Concerned Sharers, who’ve appointed themselves office guardians of sorts. They want to make sure everyone is safe. They value data control and compliance above productivity enhancing features. In other words, they are highly security conscious, which is good, but sometimes at the expense of a productive business workflow, which is not.
  • On the other end of the scale are the Convenience Users, who generally think that security stifles productivity and opt for the simplest options available, ignoring any associated risks. The mantra for these sharers tends to be “seek forgiveness rather than permission” and their sharing style can compromise enterprise security.
  • Finally, there are the Indifferent Users, who are not the least bit concerned about security. They believe that the IT department is just trying to make life difficult in order to justify their own jobs. Beware these types of sharers as they represent the greatest risk to network security.

With the changing role of the CIO/CTO in today’s evolving tech and business landscapes, new responsibilities are quickly filling up our plates. Identifying the types of sharers within your enterprise falls somewhat outside our usual mandate but lucky for you there’s an app for that. Well, more accurately, a survey we’ve developed that your employees can take to understand their sharing personality. Sometimes a little therapy is all it takes to help you feel more secure.



John Landy

John Landy

John Landy is the chief security officer at Intralinks. Having served as chief technology officer at Intralinks for the past 5 years, he utilizes his technical background to work with clients to understand their security needs in sharing and storing sensitive information. John has been working on internal Intralinks controls for enterprise security and corporate risk and oversees a function comprising Customer Engagement, Security Architecture and a Security Operations Center.