Data Breaches: How to Deal with the Big Bad Wolf and Keep Information Secure

Companies today face many hurdles when trying to create secure collaboration environments. Attacks are becoming more common and multifaceted, making it difficult for enterprises to take the appropriate preventative measures to manage security effectively.


23 September 2013

How-To-Data-Breaches-Keep-Information-Secure

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in." "No - not by the hair on my chinny chin chin."

As the wisest pig voiced in The Three Little Pigs, "It takes time, patience and hard work to build a house that is strong enough to stand up to wind, rain, and snow, and most of all, protect us from the wolf!" The same thing can be said for building a secure, impenetrable network. You can try to prevent the big bad wolf from accessing your information, but your house may not have the proper level of security to stop the wolf from blowing it down. Let’s face the brutal truth - it’s faster and easier to build a home out of straw or sticks, than to build a house out of bricks.

In fact, companies today face many hurdles when trying to create secure collaboration environments. Attacks are becoming more common and multifaceted, making it difficult for enterprises to take the appropriate preventative measures to manage security effectively. Threats like hacking, phishing and malicious insider activity can all lead to information loss and should be considered when building your collaboration environment. Even employees, who accidently mishandle information could put the organization at risk of data loss or failed compliance audits. Too often, security professionals respond to system threats instead of proactively building their brick house.

In today’s collaborative environment, organizations need a solution that allows teams to have ad-hoc collaboration with external parties while being able to adequately protect IP, secure information and meet regulatory requirements.

It may sound impossible, but companies can prevent against attacks. The folks over at Hurwitz & Associates recommend these five ways enterprises can combat threats by protecting their data:

  1. Know what collaboration tools are currently being used: Conduct an audit in your organization to understand what tools your employees are using and why. Understanding the tools’ features and employees’ use-cases will help you evaluate solutions that meet these requirements.
  2. Provide a solution that meets your employees’ needs and organization’s security requirements: Once you’ve identified the tools being used and the use-cases in your organization, the next step is to deploy the solution. Remember to put the end-user first, but do not compromise on security and control.
  3. Build on your existing solutions: You want to pick a solution that works with your other, existing solutions. This will help encourage wide adoption throughout your enterprise.
  4. Educate, manage and control how information is shared: Not everyone in your organization may know about the security risks associated with using consumer-grade sync and share applications. To keep your data secure, it’s best to provide a secure solution and educate employees on the tool’s benefits.
  5. Maintain regulatory requirements: Work with your security and legal teams to understand the regulatory environment to ensure your practices are compliant.

Don’t let the big bad wolf blow your house down. Safeguard your data against security threats by implementing an enterprise-grade collaboration solution that allows your organization to have visibility, governance and control to maintain lifetime control over your information.



Meagan Parrish

Meagan Parrish

Meagan Parrish is the Senior Manager of Social Media at Intralinks. She is responsible for social media strategy development and the communications for Intralinks' online communities. Meagan has been creating social media strategies for a variety of companies across verticals for the past several years. She holds Bachelor degrees in Marketing and Finance, with a minor in English Literature.